Brett D'Oliveira has spoken of his pride in becoming the third generation of the D'Oliveira family to score a first class hundred for Worcestershire.

But the all-rounder views his century against Oxford MCCU in The Parks as "only a start" and is determined to try and build on that innings during the 2016 campaign.

Brett's grandfather, Basil,notched his first hundred for the County in June 1964 – also against Oxford University at New Road.

And his late father Damian reached three figures for the first time against visiting Middlesex in June 1983.

Brett said: "It was a great day, something you dream of when you grow up watching cricket.

"It was great to get past that landmark but it is only a start and I want carry it on this season and get some hundreds, some big hundreds to win some games for Worcestershire in the Championship stuff.

"Don't get me wrong, I'm over the moon with getting the hundred. I'm just not getting too far ahead of myself.

"I'm looking forward to the next game and trying to get another hundred because that's what gets you recognised. It's great to get the 100, a weight off your shoulders, and now I can look forward."

Brett is delighted to emulate the milestone achieved by Basil and Damian.

He said: "It makes you proud, of course it does. Looking back and seeing my grandad and dad get a hundred in first class cricket is amazing.

"It's something I've only dreamt of doing and following in their footsteps and I've worked hard enough to get there and have finally achieved that so it is brilliant.

"There are a lot of people in my position who lose close ones and getting to that 100 and getting to that 50 in the T20 last summer (against Warwickshire) was quite an emotional time for myself and my family.

" It was great to get there, over the moon to get it but obviously you still think of those people who are close by. My dad had a huge impact on my cricketing career and probably always will do for the rest of the time that I'm playing.

"I always think about him when I reach a certain landmark or everyday that I am playing cricket, he is still somewhere in my thoughts so it was nice to get there for him. I'm sure he will be very proud."

Brett was also pleased to reach a hundred after several promising 30s and 40s when opening alongside skipper Daryl Mitchell during the latter part of last season.

He said: "That was the annoying thing. I found it frustrating towards the end of last year because I was feeling really good and often I got through the tricky periods of the new ball and the juicy wickets.

"It was a big frustrating not to go on and get that big score but I sort of proved to myself that I could the 30s and 40s so I knew I could go onto the 50s, 60s, 80s, 100 and it was great to get finally past that."

Brett is aware of the fresh challenges that opening batsmen may face this summer with the change in the 'toss' rule meaning the home side will have to bat first if the away team exercise their right to bowl first.

He said: "I don't think we will be bowling first many times at home this year! But that is something we are going to come up against, something myself and Mitch have spoken about.

"We are just going to have to accept it is one of those things and if you practice hard and prepare yourself mentally, then there is no reason why you can't score runs at the top of the order."

D'Oliveira spent the winter playing cricket for grandad Basil's former club, St. Augustine's in South Africa, and said it was an invaluable learning experience.

He said: "The winter was amazing, probably one of the best times I've had away in a long time. Probably didn't do as well as I would have liked with bat or ball but I certainly took a lot from the winter in terms of learning and playing in different conditions and playing against different players, formats, and also being away from Worcester for five months.

"I took a lot from the winter, I really enjoyed it. I had some good knocks and some good bowling figures so overall I was relatively happy. It was my first full winter away.

"I've got more family out there than I have here so it was good to see some people and catch up with some family and friends, a tremendous time.

"You only bat once a week and that is something that is very tough but, like I said, it's all learning.

"If you get a good ball and nick off early, sometimes you don't bat for another week or two so it's tough and can be hard if you are a professional trying to learn your trade and that gets in the way but it's all part of learning.

"I did a few different things, I opened, I batted in the middle order, I tried to fit in with myself and the team who wanted some more solidity in the middle order. I sort of did what they wanted really to a certain degree.

"But when the opportunity came about, I always wanted to open because I knew that is what I wanted to do for Worcestershire and hopefully I will be doing for the next couple of weeks, couple of months, couple of years."