Tom Fell hit a 41 ball century for Worcestershire Seconds who overcame a powerful Durham Seconds line-up in the first of two T20s today at Burnopfield CC.

Fell helped the Seconds chase down a 180 target with 4.1 overs to spare.

He put on 81 in six overs for the first wicket with Ollie Westbury who made 32 off 17 deliveries before he was run out.

Fell brought up his half century off 23 balls with three sixes and seven fours.

He added a further 67 in six overs for the second wicket with George Rhodes.

Fell went to three figures with the aid of six sixes and 12 fours and was eventually out for 107 off 43 deliveries.

Rhodes (28 not out) and Josh Dell (10 not out) saw the Seconds over the finishing line for their second win in the competition this summer.

Durham had been put in and totalled 179-8 in their 20 overs.

Their side contained seven of the 11 players who had been in action in the recent Specsavers County Championship match with Worcestershire at the Emirates Riverside.

Leg spinner Josh Dickenson removed openers Ryan Pringle (31) and Harry Adair (42) after they had put on 76 in seven overs.

Jacques Banton picked up three of the next four wickets to fall including Alex Lees (33) while Ed Bragg accounted for Gareth Harte (36).

Banton ended with 3-25, Dickenson 2-22 – both from three overs – Bragg 1-27 from four overs, Charlie Morris 1-32 from four and Matt Davis 1-15 from two.

Durham reversed the tables in the second game and triumphed by 35 runs.

The home side won the toss and were bowled out for 163 in 19.3 overs with Adair (37) and Harte, again with 36, the main contributors.

Banton was again amongst the wickets with 4-0-32-2 along with Dickenson, 4-0-28-2, Morris, 3.3-0-33-2, and Bragg 3-0-15-1.

Worcestershire reached 70-1 in the 10th over after Dell (48 off 34 balls with six fours) and Westbury (22) added 43 for the second wicket.

Fell chipped in with 19 off 13 balls but, from 101-3 in the 14th over, the Seconds declined to 117-9 and closed on 128-9.

Ben Whitehead (4-0-25-4) worked his way through the middle and lower order.