Every year on 11 November, Worcestershire CCC remembers its former cricketers who died during The Great War and World War Two.

The 10 killed in WW1 and 3 during WW2 are commemorated on two plaques in the Graeme Hick Pavilion at New Road.

However, loss and grieving was felt widely through many other families who played for, or supported, Worcestershire CCC.

War was declared on 4 August 1914, but Worcestershire played another seven Championship matches, three at Blackfinch New Road, before the season ended on1 September.

Many with military connections had already joined their units or seem action. More than a team of players and groundstaff had joined up before Christmas.

Only three weeks into the Great War, on 25 August, Lt Arthur Windsor-Clive,23, Coldstream Guards, a son of Worcestershire past President, the Earl of Plymouth, was killed in a treacherous ambush while defending a bridge in France.

On 19 September, Lt HJG Gilmour,31, 3rd Battn Worcestershire Regiment, the son of Worcestershire supporter and later Vice-President, Mrs Ethel Price-Hughes,OBE, was killed in the Battle of Aisne.

The following day, 20 September, a friend in the same regiment, Lt Aubrey W Hudson,31, son of great Worcestershire cricketer and captain, AH Hudson, was killed in that battle.

On 30 October, Lt Gerald EF Ward,36, 1st Life Guards, younger brother of Worcestershire President, Earl Dudley, was killed in action, and remembered on the Menin Gate Memorial.

On 31 October, 450 men of the Worcestershire Regiment fought in the Battle of Gheluvelt, in which 192 of the 1st Battalion were killed.

On 12 March 1915, Lt Col ECF Wodehouse,43, commanding 1st Battn Worcestershire Regiment, was killed in action. He had played for Worcestershire from 1880-82 and married Amy Violet Isaac, sister of Arthur and Johnnie Isaac, both killed in action.

Also during 1915, 2nd Lt CJ Dudley Smith,19, of Strensham Court and a grandson of Worcestershire President, Lord Coventry, was killed in action.

On 20 January 1916, Lt Dudley MH Jewell,22, 18th Battn Royal Fusiliers, a close relative of the Worcestershire Jewells, was killed in France.

On 16 May, 2nd Lt Edward H Jewell,21, 11th Battn Lancashire Fusiliers, a brother of Maurice and AN Jewell, was killed in France.

On 20 May, Lt Col Thomas MM Berkeley,56, Black Watch, Royal Highlanders, was killed in France. He was one of 12 children of the Berkeley family at Spetchley Park near Worcester, and played for Worcestershire from1884-91. At least four of the six boys played for Worcestershire before first class status was achieved.

On 2 October, Major Arthur C Hudson,37, 7th Royal Fusiliers, another son of Worcestershire player, AH Hudson, died of his wounds suffered on The Somme. The family’s third son was also serving with the Worcestershire Regiment.

One of those who kept Worcestershire going through The Great War was Judge RH Amphlett. He was appointed Chairman of the Committee 1914-18. Richard and Sophie Amphlett’s older son, Lt Richard F Amphlett, 38, 8th Battn Worcestershire Regiment, was killed in France on 5 April 1917.

These are just a few of so many. Hardly a Worcestershire family was unaffected by wartime injuries or death.

*Thanks to Andrew Thomas, author of ‘Pears 150’ for the above information.